Solar Energy Market on the Rise Globally

 

Alexander Christodoulakis
Alexander Christodoulakis

International financier and business executive Alexander Christodoulakis oversees a number of business ventures, including the PBS SA Capital Group, which offers financial solutions in the marine and financial sectors.

Alexander’s Portland Energy Corp. in recent years managed one of the world’s largest Cleantech portfolio’s, mainly comprising of Solar and Wind portfolios under management.

The solar energy market has soared globally in recent years. In the United States, for example, the industry has seen an increasing number of records set. Production costs of solar panels and the appeal of an alternative energy source have contributed to this growth.

Analysts predict that other markets, including China and India, will likely experience surges similar to the one in the U.S. In addition, a number of Latin American countries are anticipated to pursue investments in solar energy.

With all of these nations on board, solar could account for as much as 35 percent of the infrastructure projects completed around the world by 2040. This would represent a financial commitment of more than $3.7 trillion, making solar energy one of the top industries moving forward.

Two Types of Vertical Integration

Vertical Integration pic
Vertical Integration
Image: investopedia.com

Alexander Christodoulakis is the CEO of PBS SA Capital Group and serves as President of Portland Marine Group.

Using a vertically integrated management system within his corporate portfolio has helped to provide Alexander’s companies under management with a degree of stability and sustainability in a volatile global market.

A company that decides to vertically integrate can do so by using either a forward or backward methodology. Below is a brief description and an example of each.

1. Forward integration – This type of integration occurs when a manufacturer sells directly to the retailer, rather than going through a wholesaler. The advantage of forward integration lies in the elimination of the middleman, which reduces cost in the distribution process. Apple, Inc. adopted a forward integration business method when it began opening retail stores through which to sell its products directly to consumers.

2. Backward integration – Backward integration is a business strategy involving the purchase of one or more of the suppliers in a manufacturer’s supply chain, thereby reducing cost and streamlining business. An example of this strategy is Amazon: originally booksellers, the company integrated backwards when it went into publishing.

Vertical Integration in Business

 

Vertical Integration pic
Vertical Integration
Image: investopedia.com

As CEO of PBS SA Capital Group and President of Portland Marine Group, Alexander Christodoulakis oversees a varied portfolio of companies, with primary interests in the Transportation,shipping and energy industries. Alexander Christodoulakis utilizes a vertically integrated management system to provide financial growth and effective capital optimization within the business portfolios under the management of PBS SA Capital.

Vertical integration is a strategy used by corporations to streamline business and reduce costs. If a business has a product or service that requires several different steps, vertical integration posits that by bringing those steps “in house,” the need for outside vendors or services is eliminated, thereby increasing supply chain movement and reducing costs.

A manufacturing company that owns both supplier and distributor of its product is an example of vertical integration. For instance, if a company produces a device that requires a particular chip to make it work, by making the chip or parts for the chip within the same corporation, it will have greater control over production speed. Further, if the same company also creates a distribution center, not only does it increase supply chain speed, but it also reduces transportation expenses.